Do I qualify for social care?

The assessment process

The local authority decides whether you need care and support to help you live your day-to-day life by using an assessment process.

This must be carried out by an appropriately trained assessor, for example a social worker or occupational therapist.

A number of factors are taken in to account, and they can be found by visiting our Adult care eligibility page on our Information Directory.

To start the full assessment process, please Complete a care eligibility assessment

This will indicate whether you are likely to need a full assessment from a trained professional.

After the full assessment is complete, we will consider whether any of the needs identified are eligible for support. Further information can be found on our Information Directory.

How does the authority determine who has eligible needs?

The Care Act sets out the national minimum threshold for eligibility, which is the same across England.

Determining eligibility is important to work out whether the local authority must meet your needs for care and support.

For a list of needs that may require care and support, please visit our Adult care eligibility page.

If you are eligible, based on these needs, then the authority will discuss your care and support plan with you.

Can someone else be present at my eligibility assessment?

You are able to have a friend or family member with you at the assessment if you want to.

The Care Act states that, if you don’t have a friend or family member to support you, the council must arrange for you to have an independent advocate with you if you have difficulty doing any of the following:

  • Communicating what you want to say
  • Understanding the information given to you, or remembering it
  • Weighing up the information you are given in order to make decisions about your support

An independent advocate is a trained professional who can help you to get your voice heard at the assessment and make sure that the end result reflects your wishes and rights.

What doesn’t require social care?

There are instances where you may be struggling with your needs that don’t qualify for social care these include:

  • Gardening
  • DIY
  • Installing electrical equipment