Last updated: 25-07-2023. From web page: Reducing Drug Harm Partnership.

Southampton Reducing Drug Harm Partnership Delivery Plan

Introduction

Background

On 6th December 2021, in response to Dame Carol Black's review, the Government published their ten-year drug strategy 'From Harm to Hope: A ten-year drugs plan to cut crime and save lives1. The strategy has an ambition to reduce drug use to an overall 10-year low, and includes three core priorities, to:

  • Break the drug supply chain
  • Deliver a world class treatment and recovery system
  • Achieve a shift in the demand for recreational drugs

The strategy is supported by an increase in investment (nearly £900 million) with expected outcomes nationally by 2024 to include:

  • Preventing nearly 1,000 deaths
  • Delivering around 54,500 new high-quality drug and alcohol treatment places
  • Contributing to the prevention of ¾ of a million crimes
  • Closing over 2,000 more county lines
  • Increasing disruption of illegal drug supply activities
  • Reversing the rising trend on drug use and to reduce overall use towards a 30 year low.

Guidance2 setting out how Local Authorities should work to implement this strategy were subsequently published. This guidance included the requirement to set up a ‘Combatting Drug Partnership’. In Southampton, this partnership is called our ‘Reducing Drug Harm Partnership’.

Southampton ‘Reducing Drug Harm Partnership’ (RDHP) has been convened with the following aims;

  1. To bring together senior leaders and organisations to oversee and support the implementation and meet the requirements of the National Drug Strategy.
  2. To provide leadership and strategic oversight, working collaboratively across agencies to reduce drug and alcohol harm through accessible, evidence based, harm reduction focussed, high quality, effective and person-centred drug and alcohol prevention, treatment, recovery, and enforcement systems across Southampton

1 - From harm to hope: A 10-year drugs plan to cut crime and save lives

2 - Guidance for local delivery partners

Local Need

Needs assessment

We were tasked with delivering a needs assessment, at speed, to inform our work. We found:

Drug Use

  • Southampton experiences similar prevalence rates of adult opiate drug use when compared with England and regionally
  • Southampton experiences greater rates of crack use when compared England and regionally
  • An estimated 6,550* people aged 18-24 used any drug within the last year.
  • An estimated 10,500* people aged 18-59 used any drug within the last year.
  • 593 children live with an adult with an opiate dependency
  • It is estimated that 66,000 adults are affected by the drug or alcohol use of someone they know 

Drug Related Deaths

  • Data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) evidences Southampton a similar rate of ‘Drug Misuse’ Deaths when compared with England and ranks 9th highest among the 15 comparator UTLAs with within the fourth more deprived decile
  • Local Audits of DRD evidences a decreasing trend of drug related deaths with total number of deaths that occurred within 2020 in Southampton at its lowest point since 2013
  • Men aged over 35, particularly those in their 40s and 50s and who use heroin in combination with other depressant (benzodiazepines, alcohol, pregabalin) drugs continue to be at most risk

Drug Related Crime

  • Southampton has a significantly higher rate of police recorded drug offences when compared with England
  • Southampton ranked 5th highest among comparator Community Safety Partnerships for the rate of drug offences. (NB The number of drug offences recorded by the police is heavily dependent on police activities and priorities)
  • Data evidences a strong link between drug offences and deprivation
  • Southampton experiences more active drug networks than any other area in Hampshire
  • Southampton experiences more possession offences than any other area in Hampshire and we can see an increasing trend

Unmet need

In 2020-21

  • 66% of the estimated 1210 people in Southampton estimated to use opiates were engaged in structured treatment. Our unmet need is 34%. (England = 47%)
  • 52% of the estimated 1124 people in Southampton use crack cocaine were engaged in structured treatment. Our unmet need is 48%. (England = 58%)
  • 53% of the estimated 1452 people in Southampton use opiates and/ or crack cocaine were engaged in structured treatment. Our unmet need is 47%. (England = 53%)

Support

  • Requires focus on engagement of, and outcomes for young people and adults with non-opiate use
  • Successful completions are improving. Requires further consideration with a particular focus on Young People and people who use non-opiates

Gaps in intelligence

  • Prevalence of non-dependent drug use
  • Youth Offending
  • Activity to address drug dealing networks and drug crime
  • Evidence of the effectiveness of diversion from drug crime into treatment and support
  • Public Involvement & lived experience

Delivery Plan

Local delivery plan

As the RDHP, we are tasked with developing a local ‘Delivery Plan’ to reduce drug-related harm. The three national core priorities are associated commitments are.

Break drug supply chains

  1. Targeting the ‘middle market’ – breaking the ability of gangs to supply drugs wholesale to neighbourhood dealers
  2. Going after the money – disrupting drug gang operations and seizing their cash
  3. Rolling up county lines – bringing perpetrators to justice, safeguarding and supporting victims, and reducing violence and homicide
  4. Tackling the retail market – improving targeting of local drug gangs and street dealing
  5. Restricting the supply of drugs into prisons – applying technology and skills to improve security and detection

Deliver a world-class treatment and recovery system

  1. Delivering world-class treatment and recovery services – strengthening local authority commissioned substance misuse services for both adults and young people, and improving quality, capacity and outcomes
  2. Strengthening the professional workforce – developing and delivering a comprehensive substance misuse workforce strategy
  3. Ensuring better integration of services – making sure that people’s physical and mental health needs are addressed to reduce harm and support recovery, and joining up activity to maximise impact across criminal justice, treatment, broader health and social care, and recovery
  4. Improving access to accommodation alongside treatment – access to quality treatment for everyone sleeping rough, and better support for accessing and maintaining secure and safe housing
  5. Improving employment opportunities – linking employment support and peer support to Jobcentre Plus services
  6. Increasing referrals into treatment in the criminal justice system – specialist drug workers delivering improved outreach and support treatment requirements as part of community sentences so offenders engage in drug treatment
  7. Keeping people engaged in treatment after release from prison – improving engagement of people before they leave prison and ensuring better continuity of care in the community

Achieve a generational shift in the demand for drugs

  1. Applying tougher and more meaningful consequences – ensuring there are local pathways to identify and change the behaviour of people involved in activities that cause drug-related harm
  2. Delivering school-based prevention and early intervention – ensuring that all pupils receive a co-ordinated and coherent programme of evidence-based interventions to reduce the chances of them using drugs
  3. Supporting young people and families most at risk of substance misuse or criminal exploitation – co-ordinating early, targeted support to reduce harm within families that is sensitive to all the needs of the person or family and seeks to address the root causes of risk

Our local delivery plan for each of the 15 national commitments follows on the next page.

Breaking drug supply chains

Local delivery plan

Number Commitment Lead Agency Current position Future Work Measures
1 Targeting the ‘middle market’ – breaking the ability of gangs to supply drugs wholesale to neighbourhood dealers Police ‘Drug-related harm’ is a Force control strategy area, ensuring a focus of work within this area across all relevant commands. There are good existing relationships at a local and regional level, targeting middle market supply within the Serious and Organised Crime (SOC) space. Police to review existing strategy for dealing with cannabis factories; recent increase in numbers identified that enables disruption of supply.
Opportunities to maximise use of new technology to be pursued.
Partnership engagement to ensure relevant intelligence identified and shared as appropriate and maximise opportunities to identify those subject to exploitation.
Number of and amount of drug seizures within Southampton
2 Going after the money – disrupting drug gang operations and seizing their cash Police Cash seizures/retention forms part of the Investigation Command Delivery Plan, driving performance improvements regarding outcomes in drugs investigations Ongoing activity Number of and amount of cash seizures/retention
3 Rolling up county lines – bringing perpetrators to justice, safeguarding and supporting victims, and reducing violence and homicide Police Use of OROCHI3 model to coordinate between London, regional policing and local Constabulary to develop intelligence and operational activity. Dedicated team of 6 officers + 2 intel officers (for entire HIOW Force area) to focus on disruption.
Op Fortress – maintain information gathering from agencies and communities that helps identify vulnerable people. Monthly meeting and strategy set in relation to management of vulnerable people/addresses
Re cuckooing of addresses: Review Op Fortress monthly meeting to assess whether involvement of partners may maximise opportunities for information sharing.
Consider joint visits to vulnerable individuals where appropriate
TBC
4 Tackling the retail market – improving targeting of local drug gangs and street dealing Police

Dedicated Priority Crime Team resource within Southampton District, who provide capability for focusing on street level disruptions.

Op Fortress tackles the cuckooing of vulnerable individuals (as above)

Gap identified in relation to intelligence requirements for CPI submissions:
Review what and how we are asking for.
Deliver awareness raising and training to increase use and confidence in use
Number of CPI drug reports.
DRH matrix – date re number of active drug networks
5 Restricting the supply of drugs into prisons – applying technology and skills to improve security and detection OPCC/ ICU NB: Southampton does not host any secure estate provision Work with OPCC to consider this work on a regional basis.
ICU to work with OHID, Probation and Prisons (further detail in No7 below)
PHOF C20 rate

MPS County Lines Operations Centre

Deliver a world-class treatment and recovery system

Local delivery plan

Number Commitment Lead Agency Current position Future Work Measures
1 Strengthening local authority commissioned substance use services for both adults and young people, and improving quality, capacity and outcomes ICU

Plan for the SSMTRG (Supplemental Grant) funding submitted to OHID and agreed. (partner only version)

The Supplemental Grant has enabled us to increase staffing in Substance Use Disorder Services (SUDS) to increase quality, capacity and reduce caseloads in the following areas:

  • Young peoples SUDS
  • Criminal Justice
  • Alcohol treatment
  • LGTBQ+
  • Peer support services

Increased funding for residential rehabilitation for offenders and for Rough Sleepers (as part of the Rough Sleeper drug and Alcohol Treatment Grant.

Successful completions – move to use of the Treatment Progress measure. Increase the number of service users who have successfully completed, who are not using problem substances and who have substantially reduced their use of problem substances.

Increase the numbers in treatment

Reduce the number of Drug Related Deaths

Partnership to have ownership and overview of Supplemental Grant (SCC lead).

The Supplemental Grant has an indicative allocation for years 2 (2023/24) and Yr 3 (2024/25). However, it is still year on year funding and effective planning in advance is hampered by the need for Treasury sign off each year and delays in obtaining this and in submitting detailed plans for use of the grant. This then increases the likelihood that there will be underspend within the financial year as treatment providers have been unable to start recruitment processes well in advance of the start of the financial year. The Partnership should be aware of these difficulties and will hopefully support commissioners and providers in the difficult task of negotiating the processes required to secure the funding and to ensure effective commissioning of additional treatment services. If the Partnership is aware of any forum in which the award of sustained funding over a reasonable period of time can be championed, this would help to ensure both properly compliantly procured services and long-term planning instead of short-term plans which are then difficult to realistically achieve.

Increase numbers in structured treatment by:

  • Additional workforce capacity to provide targeted treatment for priority or vulnerable groups, including underserved ethnic groups, women/girls, LGBTQ communities, and people engaged in chemsex
  • Additional workforce capacity to provide targeted treatment for those experiencing difficulty with dependant alcohol use.
  • Additional workforce capacity for offenders engaging with the Criminal Justice Intervention Team.

Increase numbers in residential rehabilitation:

  • Assess the review of residential rehabilitation provision in the South East, which Portsmouth commissioned on behalf of all South East local authorities, to explore the potential for further collaborate approaches.
  • Increase residential rehabilitation placements to 2% of caseload by 2024/25

Reduce the number of Drug Related Deaths by:

  • Ensuring access to training in the use of Naloxone/nyxoid and supply.
  • Ensuring harm reduction strategies are in place and offered to all service users routinely.
  • Expanding naloxone supply and training to police and probation colleagues.

DNA/ TAD Dashboard

Treatment Progress Measure

Numbers in treatment/ unmet need

2 Strengthening the professional workforce – developing and delivering a comprehensive substance use workforce strategy ICU/SUDS

The adult service provider has a comprehensive national workforce plan in place which has been shared with commissioners and can be provided if required.

The Young Peoples provider has indicated that they are moving to a talent management and development plan. This is localised to teams and individuals. The provider carries out annual personal development plans that are reviewed quarterly for each individual. The staff member then has access to a variety of training courses that can include NVQ type courses and degrees.

Providers to implement the 2022 Workforce Development Strategy and participate in national workforce development. Partnership to collaborate strategically.

Local work for example:

  • Providers of Substance Use Disorder Services (SUDS) services are currently working to improve recruitment practices. There is on-going targeted recruitment campaign publicising employee and volunteer offer to increase applications for local vacancies, including from under-represented groups, supported by central marketing teams where available (e.g. resourcing local events/media).
  • Targeted recruitment to criminology, sociology and psychology graduates
  • Enhanced visibility of consolidated staff benefits package
  • Additional central HR support to reduce recruitment administration burden on local teams
  • Refreshed recruitment training for all local managers to support values-based inclusive and safer recruitment.
  • System improvements to recruitment processes, enabling quicker turnaround and better candidate experience
  • Refreshed on-boarding process for new starters
  • Improved training offer to staff, volunteers and peers.

Retention

  • Ongoing development of hybrid and flexible working initiatives so staff have greater choice over their working patterns and work life balance, whilst prioritising the needs of those who use our services
  • Ongoing development of staff wellbeing initiatives including reflective practice spaces

Increased staffing complement.

Improved staff training and qualifications

Reduced caseload numbers.

Improved successful completions

Treatment Progress Measure

3 Ensuring better integration of services – making sure that people’s physical and mental health needs are addressed to reduce harm and support recovery, and joining up activity to maximise impact across criminal justice, treatment, broader health and social care, and recovery SCC (ICU)
  • In-reach worker to Antelope and Natalie House (co-occurring conditions.
  • MH and SUDS Partnership group
  • Criminal Justice Intervention Team
  • Continuity of Care group working with probation and local prison
  • Work with local pharmacists to reduce risk of unplanned closures including a protocol for use when unexpected closures are threatened.
  • Work with ICB and Primary care re treatment for those experiencing difficulties with prescribed medication.
  • Dedicated co-occurring conditions action plan as part of Mental Health Transformation Plan
  • For deep-dive review in June/September 2023 meeting, with particular focus on secondary mental health care

Actions otherwise planned or underway:

  • Appoint In-reach worker to Antelope and Natalie House. The role to date has proved very successful with 45 patients being contacted and worked with within the two units. The post is currently vacant and is being advertised. Opportunities to expand the hours and scope of the post are being considered, in order to make it more attractive and to offer a similar service to the remaining two rehabilitation units (Forest Lodge and Crowlin).
  • The MH and SUDS Partnership group will continue to meet on a quarterly basis and provide an opportunity for representatives from SUDS and MH teams to improve pathways into treatment and to discuss opportunities for joint development and commissioning of services where appropriate.
  • SUDS services will continue the current training and networking offer to all CMHT’s and other MH teams across the city.
  • Expand training opportunities for SUDS workers from local MH services.
  • Continue to develop pathways between SUDS and IAPT (Steps to Well-being)
  • The MH/SUDS Partnership will continue to work to further develop pathways into treatment and skillsets for staff.
  • Criminal Justice work is developing well with the Criminal Justice Intervention Team working jointly with the National Probation Service, police, courts and prisons in order to identify offenders with a drug or alcohol issue and to improve Continuity of Care in line with national targets for the 2021 Drug Strategy. In 2022/23 the Supplemental Grant enabled us to expand the capacity of the CJIT and to embed the work of the team across the criminal justice setting in Southampton. Further expansion of the team is planned for Yr 3 of the grant funding.
  • Work with local pharmacies to deliver further improvements to availability of supervised consumption and needle syringe programmes and reduce unexpected closures.
  • Work with Primary care and the ICB in order to map what is available to those experiencing difficulty with prescribed medication and what the need is for support and treatment where appropriate.
  • Physical and mental wellbeing health checks to be integrated into all assessments and reviews.
  • Review smoking cessation pathways for those accessing SUDS treatment.
  • Access to treatment
  • Sustained engagement
  • Treatment Progress Measure
  • Numbers in stable accommodation
  • Improved access to treatment for co-occurring drug and alcohol dependence and mental ill health needs
  • GP registration
  • General health care engagement
  • Access to inpatient detox/residential rehab (where appropriate)
4 Improving access to accommodation alongside treatment – access to quality treatment for everyone sleeping rough, and better support for accessing and maintaining secure and safe housing SCC (ICU)

Rough Sleeper Drug and Alcohol Outreach Team – working with those who are rough sleeping and those at risk of rough sleeping in partnership with SCC Housing Related Support processes.

The Rough Sleeper Drug and Alcohol Outreach team is funded by DLUCH through the Rough Sleeper Drug and Alcohol Treatment Grant. The grant was awarded in 2021. As with the work funded via the Supplemental Grant recruitment has proved challenging. Most roles for the team have now been filled although the appointment of a Nurse Prescriber is still to occur.

For June 2023 deep-dive agenda item. Partnership to also be involved with development of SCC homelessness strategy

Partnership service work includes:

The Rough Sleeper Drug and Alcohol Outreach team will continue to work with those who are rough sleeping and who are at risk of homelessness. The team works closely with a range of other outreach and homelessness services, including: Street Homeless Prevention Team, Homeless Healthcare Team (including mental health support for the homeless population), Homeless Vulnerable Adult Support Team, Women selling sex on street outreach and rough Sleeper Initiative navigators.

  • The RSDA team will run a Buvidal Pilot for up to 10 service users at a time.
  • Work with partners and stakeholders to develop a programme of engaging with existing housing services in Southampton.
  • Explore opportunities for developing a joint working agreement between LA housing services and SUDS services.

1. Numbers in stable accommodation

2. General healthcare engagement

3. Access to impatient detox/residential rehab (where appropriate).

Other intelligence

  • Access to treatment
  • Sustained engagement
  • Treatment Progress Measure 
  • Numbers in stable accommodation
  • Improved access to treatment for co-occurring drug and alcohol dependence and mental ill health needs
  • GP registration
  • General health care engagement
5 Improving employment opportunities – linking employment support and peer support to Jobcentre Plus services

SCC (ICU incl. links to JCP)

JCP/ DWP

Individual Placement Service project working with adult and YP SUDS

Independent Peer Support Service to be commissioned in 2023/24 – will work alongside services to encourage and support service users with employment opportunities.

March 2023 deep-dive agenda item for the Partnership.

Provider to build on the existing service user strategy to further develop existing volunteer programme.

Continue to embed the Individual Placement Support intensive employment programme to support those accessing SUDS back into employment.

Use peer supports to enhance this offer.

Independent Peer Support service to be commissioned in 2023/24

Studies suggest Employment reduces re-offending by a third – this is why employment is so crucial in reducing harm.

Engage DWP Jobcentre and Prison Work Coaches to proactively signpost to community-based support including IPS

Link to LSIP Local Skills Improvement Plan which is currently mapping provision throughout Hampshire including Southampton – to ensure individuals can upskill and increase earning potential to provide legitimate financial income

Focus support on areas of deprivation in the city to build aspirations, increase skills levels and earning potential – in work progression.

Include current DWP / SCC Partnership agreement as a working model to increase opportunities including funding opportunities for all the above.

Increase potential scope of DWP/SCC Youth Hub as a focal point for raising aspiration and mentoring opportunities

  • Access to IPS service
  • Job outcomes
  • Peers engaged in Independent Peer Support service.
  • NDTMS TOPS employment outcomes at successful completion of treatment
6 Increasing referrals into treatment in the criminal justice system – specialist drug workers delivering improved outreach and support treatment requirements as part of community sentences so offenders engage in drug treatment SUDS (incl links Police/ Probation/ ICU) CJIT team working closely with NPS, local prisons and police

Continue to work with local Probation, police and prisons teams to ensure:

  • Increased access to treatment for offenders in the community and on release from custodial settings
  • DRR’s and ATR’s are working effectively, offering joint assessments and seamless support.
  • Pathways to and from the new Dependency and Recovery Service are effective and appropriate referrals are made.
  • Harm reduction in the form of needle exchange programmes and the offer of naloxone is available to the caseload.
  • Offer of training in the use of Naloxone/nyxoid and supply to police officers as part of a pilot.
  • Work with probation service to offer naloxone/nyxoid availability in contact centres.
  • Work with police to offer Drug Testing on Arrest.
  • Tailored offer of psychosocial interventions to offenders engaged with the service.
  • Increase number of Drug Rehabilitation Requirements (DRR) and Alcohol Treatment Requirements (ATR)

Treatment Progress Measure

  • Increased numbers of offenders in treatment
  • Increased engagement in PSI
7 Keeping people engaged in treatment after release from prison – improving engagement of people before they leave prison and ensuring better continuity of care in the community SUDS (links to Probation & Prisons) Continuity of Care group – some improvement noted but further work required.
  • Agree and establish robust pathway for managing referrals from prisons based on national guidelines
  • Foster good and frequent two-way communication with all key referring prisons
  • Arrange in-reach services to prepare prisoners for release.

Review NDTMS recording processes to ensure they comply with guidance

  • Increased rate of “pick up” from the top six referring prisons into community treatment.
  • PHOF C20

Achieve a generational shift in the demand for drugs

Local delivery plan

Number Commitment Lead Agency Current position Future Work Measures
1 Applying tougher and more meaningful consequences – ensuring there are local pathways to identify and change the behaviour of people involved in activities that cause drug-related harm Police Drug Testing on arrest pilot in Basingstoke; agreement and funding has been obtained to roll out to Southampton. Existing partnership work to ensure mandatory referrals to support services following identification within custody.

Evaluate evidence of Basingstoke (and Portsmouth?) pilots and consider development in Southampton

Consider joint work with CGL to develop, deliver and evaluate conditional cautioning process

Data monitoring of mandatory referral outcomes

Hampshire & IOW Reducing Reoffending Subgroup

2 Delivering school-based prevention and early intervention – ensuring that all pupils receive a co-ordinated and coherent programme of evidence-based interventions to reduce the chances of them using drugs

SCC (Children’s)

No Limits

Prevention and early intervention plan

  • “BUZZ” educational sessions delivered in all secondary schools and 6th Form colleges in Southampton
  • Educational support offer funded by SSMTRG will commence in quarter 4 2022/23.

The new Educational Support offer will:

  • Develop and maintain relationships with the 14 secondary schools in Southampton including the Compass and The Polygon (PRU’s) and the Virtual School
  • Adapt and deliver 3-hour training to teaching staff to improve the quality of drug education within schools and develop a whole school approach
  • Help schools identify children affected by either their own or others substance use and support them to make appropriate referrals to treatment
  • Deliver brief intervention work to individual or groups of students who have been identified as at risk of risky substance use
  • Support the Early Help team to deliver Buzz sessions when needed
  • Utilise digital technology and social media to increase awareness of health risks associated with substance misuse to enable people to make informed choices about their lifestyle.
  • Develop a specific offer of support for young people at risk of exclusion due to drugs/alcohol. Work alongside schools to support the young person to remain in school.

Increase access to treatment and support for young people in schools and colleges.

Increase  numbers of 11-17 year olds in treatment.

3 Supporting young people and families most at risk of substance misuse or criminal exploitation – co-ordinating early, targeted support to reduce harm within families that is sensitive to all the needs of the person or family and seeks to address the root causes of risk

SCC (Children’s)

No Limits

Establish co-located specialist drug and alcohol youth workers within the Youth Hub, working jointly with Childrens Social Care.

 

Develop a skilled wider workforce who feel confident and supported in being able to deliver consistent and well-informed prevention and education messages on substance misuse.

 

Establish a young peoples drug and alcohol outreach team

Partnership to work through the Children’s and Young People’s Strategic Partnership Board for delivery.

 

We will employ three full time link workers who will be co-located within the Youth Hub. 

  • Working with Children’s Services to identify YPs with drug/alcohol issues and those who have parents who are dependant
  • Supporting the team around the family to work with young people and deliver appropriate interventions
  • Hold clinics for social workers, family support and early help to answer substance related enquiries and improve confidence
  • Deliver training to social workers to increase knowledge and skills around brief interventions and harm minimisation.
  • Deliver targeted support for children and young people who are particularly vulnerable to substance use, to increase resilience and reduce risk. Support will focus on safeguarding, harm minimisation and hidden harm relating to the whole family approach.

 

We will employ 3 FTE Youth Outreach workers who will provide:

  • Detached working during and after school hours, visiting known locations where young people congregate to build relationships over time and share harm minimisation messages
  • Targeted outreach to night-time economy hotspots to promote harm minimisation and treatment services
  • Quick easy access to treatment
  • Build relationships with night club owners and promotors to develop a presence in clubs, bars, raves and concerts where drug use is likely to be high
  • Liaise with police and the young people’s service to enable identifying and targeting hotspots or local trends
  • Be part of Southampton’s wider contextual safeguarding approach

 

  • Number of 11–17-year-olds in treatment.
  • Other metrics to be developed”

 

Other outcomes

  • Reduce the harms associated with substance misuse, particularly for those who are most vulnerable.

 

  • Preventing the escalation of use and harm within young people, including stopping young people from becoming drug or alcohol dependent adults

 

  • Increased awareness of substance misuse in the population and where to get help if required